publications

Congratulations to Trisha Barnard on her recent publication in Viruses!

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Congratulations to Trisha Barnard (Ph.D. Candidate) and Mike Rajah (M.Sc. 2017), who published their comparative analysis of historical and contemporary Zika virus isolates this week in Viruses. There study is entitled: “Contemporary Zika virus isolates induce more dsRNA and produce more negative-strand intermediate in human astrocytoma cells”.

View the abstract here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30572570

Identification of a novel hepacivirus in lemurs!

Congratulations to our coauthors for publication of a new study this week in Archives in Virology entitled “Virus discovery reveals a high prevalence and a great diversity of members of the Flaviviridae in wild lemurs”. Interestingly, it appears that this new hepacivirus has a miR-122 site in its 5’ UTR! 

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30460488

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Congratulations to Sophie Cousineau who co-authored a paper this week in Canadian Liver Journal!

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Congratulations to Sophie Cousineau (Ph.D. Candidate), who coauthored a meeting summary that was published this week in the Canadian liver Journal entitled: “The 7th Canadian Symposium on Hepatitis C Virus: Toward Elimination of HCV: How to Get There”.


View the abstract here: https://canlivj.utpjournals.press/doi/abs/10.3138/canlivj.2018-0018

Congratulations to Annie Bernier on her recent publication in Nucleic Acids Research!

Congratulations to Annie Bernier (Ph.D. Candidate), who together with our collaborators at the University of Saskatchewan (Dr. Yalena Amador-Cañizares and Dr. Joyce Wilson) published an article this week (ahead of press) in Nucleic Acids Research entitled: “miR-122 does not impact recognition of the HCV genome by innate sensors of RNA but rather protects the 5’ end from the cellular pyrophosphatases, DOM3Z and DUSP11.”


Sagan and Richer Labs Collaborate To Shed New Light on Immune System Response to Zika Virus

A new mouse model with a working immune system could be used in laboratory research to improve understanding of Zika virus infection and aid development of new treatments, according to a study published in PLOS Pathogens.